Religion & Beliefs Thread views: 1261
Risingtide
Member
08/25/09 10:56 AM


Posts: 677
Location: South Africa
Member since: 06/24/07 11:01 AM
Last online: 11/26/18 11:51 PM
The Bardo Thodol 1
Post: #111004
Reply to this post Reply 
To pick up from another thread, the following may possibly serve as discussion points.
I will post it in a few chunks for easier digestion and better threading if question arise. If nothing else I think the text has some beautiful poetic passages.

The first few posts will set the context.

Amituofo
"Life knows its needs"

Edited by Risingtide on 08/25/09 10:59 AM.




 Like   Dislike 
Risingtide
Member
08/25/09 10:57 AM


Posts: 677
Location: South Africa
Member since: 06/24/07 11:01 AM
Last online: 11/26/18 11:51 PM
Re: The Bardo Thodol 1
Post: #111005 / Re: Risingtide #111004
Reply to this post Reply 
The Tibetan Book of The Dead,
Composed by Padmasambhava,
Revealed by Terton Karma Lingpa
Translated by Gyurme Dorje
Edited by Graham Coleman with Thupten Jinpa
Penguin Books, London, 2005, 2006

Among the ancient schools of thought, which accepted the notion of continuity of consciousness, there were several non-Buddhist philosophical schools which regarded the entity, the ‘I’ or ‘self’, which migrated from existence to existence as being unitary and permanent. They also suggest that this ‘self’ was autonomous in its relationship to the psycho-physical components that constitute a person. In other words, they believed or posited that there is an essence or ‘soul’ of the person, which exists independently from the body and the mind of the person.

However, Buddhist philosophy does not accept the existence of such an independent, autonomous entity. In the Buddhist view, the self or the person is understood in terms of a dynamic interdependent relationship of both mental and physical attributes, that is to say the psycho-physical components which constitute a person. In other words, our sense of self can, upon examination, be seen as a complex flow of mental and physical events, clustered in clearly identifiable patterns, including our physical features, instincts, emotions, and attitudes, etc., continuing through time.

Further, according to Prasangika-Madhyamaka philosophy, which has become the prevailing philosophical view of Tibetan Buddhism today, this sense of self is simply a mental construct, a mere label given to this cluster of dependently arising mental and physical events in dependence on their continuity.

Introductory commentary by HH the XIVth Dalai Lama, page xv ff.


Amituofo
"Life knows its needs"

Edited by Risingtide on 08/25/09 10:59 AM.




 Like   Dislike 
Risingtide
Member
08/25/09 11:02 AM


Posts: 677
Location: South Africa
Member since: 06/24/07 11:01 AM
Last online: 11/26/18 11:51 PM
Re: The Bardo Thodol 1
Post: #111006 / Re: Risingtide #111004
Reply to this post Reply 
As far as the concept of emptiness or the ultimate nature of reality is concerned this is one area where there is an emerging convergence between the Buddhist understanding of the ultimate nature of existence and the evolving contemporary scientific view.
This convergence relates to the unfindability of entities when these are analytically sought. In modern science the methods of analysis are principally applied to investigating the nature of material entities. Thus, the ultimate nature of matter is sought through a reductive process and the macroscopic world of particles. Yet, when the nature of particles is further examined, we find that ultimately their very existence as objects is called into question. This interface between non-substantiality and phenomena is a fundamental focus of Buddhist philosophical analysis and of experiental analysis through meditation on the nature of mind. As is now becoming more commonly known in the contemporary field, a subtle understanding of the nature of the arising and dissolution of both individual thoughts and the cycles of existence lies at the heart of Buddhist literature and practice.

Introductory commentary by HH the XIVth Dalai Lama, page xxvii ff.


Amituofo
"Life knows its needs"



 Like   Dislike 
 
 
Jump to